Real Food App!

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Can’t it be a hassle to find healthy food on the road? Don’t get me wrong–I love traveling, and I love seeing what other communities have to share in their local restaurants, farmers’ markets and natural food stores.  I think it can be a GREAT way to learn a lot about a town or city, and can be a wonderful way to meet like-minded locals.  But FINDING these locales can be a bit of a challenge sometimes.

Thankfully, this just got a LOT easier!

For $6 a year, you can download the Find Real Food App for the Weston A. Price Foundation, and get this information directly on your smartphone–YAY!

I had the opportunity to meet the wonderful couple who have spent the last 3 years developing this app, and when they told me the price, I thought for sure the cost was per month–which still seemed reasonable to me!–but when they told me it was per YEAR, I was shocked!

All you’ll need to do is enter the zip code you’d like to search, and products, restaurants and other whole food entities will pop up on your screen–and they’re even ranked on a GOOD-BETTER-BEST system, by people who care deeply about finding the highest quality foods at the Weston A. Price foundation.

So in this busy season of travel, do yourself a favor and equip your phone with an incredibly helpful tool that keeps on giving!

Elderberry Water Kefir

Delicious and delightful elderberry water kefir!

Delicious and delightful elderberry water kefir!

Cold and flu season has arrived — good times.

Thankfully, the natural world has much to offer in support of a healthy immune system, not the least of which is immune-enhancing beneficial bacteria, and wellness-enhancing  plants, such as the long-revered elderberry, traditionally used in treating respiratory ailments, allergies, and combating influenza.

So, why not bring them together?

I found dried, organic elderberries at the natural food store, and of course the first thing I think to do is ferment them.  Since I have water kefir always prepared at home, that was no problem.

Elderberries are quite tart–meaning very little sugar content–and they are very hard when dried.  So, I did more than just put them in some finished water kefir.

Here are the details:

Elderberry Water Kefir

  • 2 tablespoons Dried Elderberries
  • 1/2 cup very hot chlorine-free water
  • 3 tablespoons fresh, frozen or dried Blueberries (Concord Grapes and/or Thompson Raisins work well, too)
  • 2 cups Water Kefir (without the grains/SCOBY)

Place the elderberries in a mug and pour over the hot water.  Allow to sit for 3-4 hours, then pour into a pint or quart-sized glass jar. Add the blueberries or grapes and pour in the water kefir.  Cap tightly and allow to sit for 12-24 hours at room temperature for a second fermentation cycle (the first being when the water kefir was created from sugar water, as described in my book, The Funky Kitchen.)  Strain and consider enjoying an ounce or two each day.  May be stored in the refrigerator until complete, to slow the second fermentation process.

Up close shot of dried elderberries

Up close shot of dried elderberries

Elderberries and blueberries fermenting in water kefir

Elderberries and blueberries fermenting in water kefir

 

A Smorgasbord of Cultured Yumminess!!

Carrots directly from Tonopah Rob's All-Natural Farm

Beautiful carrots from the farmer’s market

 

I was so pleasantly surprised to see not just one, but two, posts on Facebook today about one of my favorite foods…salad!  Clearly, my friends and I are like birds of a feather, because as I looked at the wonderful deliciousness of the grilled summer squash salad from my Canadian compadre, and the farmer’s market melange by way of my Austin, Texas ami, it was very clear we could have made one another’s salads–no problem!

Humble beginnings to a homemade kraut Photo courtesy of Vera Almann

Humble beginnings to a homemade kraut

And then, to come to my email Inbox today and find another mention of salad, this by one of my favorite companies, Cultures for Health, well, it just felt like the salad days of summer!  No doubt about it–this summer has delivered on a bumper crop of great produce all over the country, and folks are making the most of it.

Veggies on top of chopped tomatoes, ready to blend it all together!

Veggies on top of chopped tomatoes, ready to blend it all together for a fermented salsa!

So, if you have your own wonderful produce you’re wishing to toss in a bowl and create something wonderful, then do check out this article from Cultures for Health…it is FULL of great recipes of cultured foods you can make at home that are a GREAT addition to your salad fix’ins, which will elevate your salad experience to a whole new level!  And for good measure, here’s one of my old favorite recipes, Avocado and Papaya Salad–yum!!

Papaya, avocado, pumpkin seeds and cayenne topping fresh greens from our spring garden.  Absolutely heavenly drizzled with walnut oil and fresh lime juice.  Home-brewed kombucha or raw apple cider vinegar would work great, too!

Papaya, avocado, pumpkin seeds and cayenne topping fresh greens from our spring garden. Absolutely heavenly drizzled with walnut oil and fresh lime juice. Home-brewed kombucha or raw apple cider vinegar would work great, too!

 

 

Dr. Jack Tips on the Wellness of Our Bellies and Our Bodies and Our Minds

Dr. Jack Tips speaks volumes and with passion about the importance of keeping our biome healthy and happy!  Excellent presentation with Underground Wellness.  Click here.

Some Basic Wellness Tips for a Tough Viral Season

A beautiful sunset shot from our neighborhood school where we lost one of our sweet first graders this week.

A beautiful sunset shot from our neighborhood school where we lost one of the sweet first graders to illness.

This week held a tremendously sad event for our community, where we lost one of our little first graders to a very serious respiratory illness.  In the wake of that, and the ensuing communication I received from parents and patients, I decided to pull this short list of wellness suggestions together…there are hundreds of other things I could include, but this is a very solid start that is very reasonable to attain.

Here is the letter I posted on Facebook:

Hello my friends. As many of you know, we lost one of our own yesterday afternoon after a tough battle with a very serious respiratory infection. He was a little first-grader right here at our kids’ school across the street. With the communication I’ve had with parents yesterday and today, I wrote the following post for our local communities–but, with the positive feedback I’m getting on the post, I’m going to post it here for everyone, as we definitely seem to be faced with some virulent pathogens right now. Blessings and well-wishes for you and your loved ones–take good care and take care of one another.

I’d like to just share some natural ideas you can use at home as you look to keep everyone well:

1. Keep the sugars down in the diet–it is incredible the impact sugar has on the immune system–it is no accident that the cold and flu season officially gets underway the week after Halloween. Sugars include the obvious choices, but also fruit juices, sports drinks, granola bars–read the sugar content of the foods you’re eating and make changes as appropriate.

2. Get some sun–without sunscreen. Balanced exposure of our skin to the sun is not only integral for natural Vitamin D production, but also the production and use of sulfur in our bodies. Don’t get burned, but 10 minutes or so of mid-day sun (just go walk around the yard and smell the flowers), in a tank top, a couple times a day, will be a huge boon to your wellness.

3. Drink only water–juices are full of sugars, and while they may have some nutrient value, you’re better off having an orange, with its fiber and raw nutrients, then a pasteurized, concentrated version. Put a healthy squirt of lemon or lime juice into your water for some fresh Vitamin C.

4. Eat foods that are rich in naturally-occurring probiotics, a huge benefit to the immune system. Kombucha, water kefir, raw sauerkraut (not the jarred stuff from the grocery aisles–that’s pasteurized), plain yogurt and plain milk kefir–these are all great sources of naturally-occurring probiotics. Note that I mentioned PLAIN–sweeten and flavor with fresh fruit and Stevia extract to sweeten.

5. Rest–if you feel like sleeping, sleep–our body heals much more efficiently in deep sleep. Not a time for pressing on with caffeine, which taps the adrenals and can set someone up for a big challenge on the immune system.

6. Make chicken soup–from a whole chicken, using only water, salt, garlic, onion, celery, carrots, black pepper, and a splash of apple cider vinegar, or the juice of 2 lemons. Don’t use prepared broth or bouillon cubes–you won’t need them with the flavor from the chicken. Put into a crockpot for the easiest method. Chicken soup helps to loosen the phlegm that arises in the chest, and has anti-inflammatory properties.

7. Consider using medicinal grade essential oils to support the immune system.  Oregano, thyme, tea tree, lemon, basil, frankincense, lavender, orange, clove, rosemary.  These are oils that have shown very good effect in supporting the immune system as it rallies against viruses and bacteria.
Please consider these suggestions–if they seem a good fit for your needs, use them–if not, that’s OK, too. I just wanted to share what I’m sharing with others, and how I’m taking care of our family. If you have more questions, you can contact me at sarica@naturallylivingtoday.com.

Blessings, love and peace to you all!

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Fermentation in the Summertime? Yes, It Can Happen!

Refreshing homemade yogurt

Refreshing homemade yogurt–Enjoyed all year long!

Culturing and fermenting foods is becoming an increasingly hot topic in the culinary world.  Who wouldn’t love the gut-benefiting and immune-boosting enhancements that these methods bring to our nutrition, all the while delivering on much more interesting and complex flavors, techniques that break down food macronutrients into easier-to-assimalate components?  Enhanced flavor, better nutrient use, helps to keep a body well–sign me up!

Wild (as in CRAZY) Fermentation in the Summer Months

But all is not rosy when the seasons change and temperatures rise, at least as pertains to cultured and fermented foods. Beneficial bacteria and yeasts–the foundation of these changes–like to work in a certain temperature range, and when the house starts heating up with the warmer days of summer, these temperatures can be too hot, too fast.

Freshly made water kefir to add to the salsa

Freshly made water kefir–a perfect culture starter, or a delightful probiotic beverage on its own–but it doesn’t like to get too hot!

 

Water kefir that has been a delicious and nutritious homemade probiotic beverage during the winter and spring, starts taking on strange and pungent aromas and flavors as the days grow warmer and longer.  Fermenting vegetables are pushed up and out of their containers within a couple of days of preparing them, with the increasing heat generating a lot of carbon dioxide in a very short window of time.  Milk kefir, usually a mellow ferment on the kitchen counter, quickly separates into curds and whey, leaving a marked separation between the cultured milk solids and the increasingly acetone-scented liquid.

Whey and curds in yogurt

Notice the whey in the middle of the curds in this yogurt that cultured at too high of a temperature

Definitely not too appetizing.

Keeping Ferments and Cultures Calm, Cool and Collected!

If any of the above describe what happens to you in the summer months as you attempt to maintain your fermentation practices, you might consider being a little more mindful of the temperature ranges you’re fermenting in.  Ferments and cultures that do best in the 60-75 degree Fahrenheit range (about 15.5-23.8 degrees Celsius) really won’t do well if your home gets warmer than this.  My workaround for this, living in the Mojave Desert of the American Southwest, is to prepare my ferments, and then keep them cooler than my kitchen at its warmest points.

Happy Water Kefir, Milk Kefir and Mesophilic Yogurt Culturing

Plan to prepare each of these as you normally would, only do so at night.  Then, whether the cooling system is on so you can sleep at a more comfortable temperature, or, because the outdoor night air has cooled to a temperature comfortable to sleep in,  leave these ferments on the kitchen counter, or outside on a table (whichever appears to be coolest.)  The home (and hopefully the outdoors!) will eventually be in the mid-to-high 70’s, and, with the cool ingredients (milk or water) going into mix, the final temperature will stay in the cooler temperature range through the night as the ingredients slowly warm to the ambient temperature. There have certainly been some flat-out hot nights here in the desert, where the temperature doesn’t dip below 90, so, in those instances, I definitely leave the ferments indoors.

The next morning, as temperatures begin to warm in earnest, move the ferment to the warmest part of your refrigerator. This allows the fermentation to continue, but at a much slower pace.  Generally, this allows for the cycle to complete for the day.  Every person’s refrigerator is different, so if you find yours seems to stop the fermentation cold (pun intended), then you might consider making a cooling box, of an ice chest stocked with a couple zipper bags of ice.

This is an art, with scientific components at its root, so you’ll have to find the method that best works for you.  You just want to find that happy spot that keeps things cool, but not too cool.  We keep our refrigerator on the medium setting, so, putting my ferments away from the cooling element seems to work fine for us.

Fermenting Summer’s Bounty as a Salsa or Sauerkraut–to be Enjoyed In the Summer!

I really get to missing fermented veggies over the summer, and the best way to get around this (short of purchasing some from the grocery) is to learn to work with the heat of summer.  Plan to prepare your veggies for fermentation as usual, but handling from that point forward requires a little more care than simply placing in a cool spot in a closet or at the back of the pantry.

Salsa--lids in place and ready to ferment for a day…and enjoy tomorrow!

Salsa ready to ferment in the cooler, then transfer to the fridge for a slower fermentation process

Once your veggies are prepared, place them in an ice chest or some other insulated environment, into which you’ll place a few zipper bags of ice.  Keep them in this container for about three days, switching out the ice every 10-12 hours, to keep the temperature cool (an ambient temperature between 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit/15.5-21 degrees Celsius) is a very good spot.  At the end of this period, move the ferment to your warmest spot in your refrigerator (which might be a little crowded with your other ferments and cultures!), and plan to enjoy in about four weeks.

Using a little ingenuity and an extra nod to the attention to detail on temperature should allow you to enjoy your ferments and cultures throughout the year.  And there is nothing as refreshing as some fresh water kefir with a twist of lemon juice and a sprinkle of Himalayan Salt after a hot afternoon in the sun–so be sure to keep those home ferments brewing!

 

 

20 Life-Changing Minutes

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If you ever notice that I become incredibly uncomfortable when I see kids eating donuts, or Doritos and Gatorade being handed out as a snack…if you take 20 minutes to watch this video, you will have an excellent understanding of why. This is why I do what I do and why I post what I post. Please take 20 minutes for a deeper understanding of the issues we face…This video will put the information right in front of you in an easy to understand format that is life-changing.

Fresh Salsa…Mildly Fermented!

Delicious, fresh tomato salsa…ready to enjoy immediately, or to ferment a bit for a healthy beneficial bacteria profile!

Delicious, fresh tomato salsa…ready to enjoy immediately, or to ferment a bit for a healthy beneficial bacteria profile!

Freshly made salsa is so delightful–it is a perfect compliment to eggs, meats, beans, you name it.  And it is one of those condiments that makes nearly everyone happy, whether they’re following Paleo Diet principles, GAPS dietary prescriptions or raw food ideals.  Or, maybe someone just doesn’t bother too much with concern for their nutrition…fresh salsa works for this group, too (and it is a great way to get some fantastic nutrition into them, with a smile on their face!)

I love preparing and enjoying food in its proper season…and since we live in the desert southwest of the U.S., all of these ingredients are here, even in winter.  This is fantastic, as this recipe is a great source of naturally-occuring Vitamin C and gut-boosting beneficial bacteria, thanks to the water kefir and mild fermentation.  Both of these qualities are real boosts when it’s cold and flu season (and this salsa tastes great!)

This is a blended salsa–in this instance, I’ve used our food processor.  However, if you only have a blender, feel free to use it.  Either kitchen tool works fine.

This recipe can be enjoyed without the inclusion of the water kefir and the 24 hour room-temperature fermentation cycle, and it will be incredibly delicious if you choose to prepare it this way.  But, if you do choose to follow the recipe as delivered in its entirety, you’ll not only have the boost to the beneficial bacterial profile, but the salsa will last much longer (remember, fermentation is an ancient food preservation technique–and when combined with the modern-day convenience of refrigeration, the combination can lend itself to an extended shelf life.) However, this benefit of the salsa storing longer in the refrigerator if mildly fermented is really a moot point–it is so tasty, it won’t last long in any case!

Mildly Fermented Fresh Tomato and Cilantro Salsa

Makes approximately 2 quarts salsa

  • Approximately 4 cups organic Cherry or Plum Tomatoes
  • 2 organic Bell Peppers, preferably red, yellow or orange, coarsely chopped
  • Approximately 1 cup loosely packed organic Cilantro, rinsed and coarsely chopped
  • 3-4 organic Green Onions (Scallions), rinsed and coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen organic Pineapple and/or Mango
  • 4-5 cloves organic Garlic
  • 1 organic Jalapeño Pepper, seeds removed if you don’t want it too hot
  • 3 teaspoons Himalayan or Celtic Sea Salt, or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon Chipotle Powder
  • 1/4 cup Water Kefir (Kombucha or fresh Whey would work as well)

Place tomatoes in the carafe of the food processor or blender and coarsely chop, then add the rest of the ingredients.  Blend/chop well until incorporated and uniform.  Spoon into 2 glass quart-sized jars, cap with lids, and leave at room temperature for 24 hours (do this final step if you’ve added some kind of culture for fermentation–such as water kefir.  Otherwise, you can simply store the salsa in the refrigerator immediately.)  If mildly fermented before refrigeration, you can expect the salsa to last at least a week in the refrigerator.  If no fermentation has occurred, then plan to enjoy the salsa within four days.

Fresh veggies for salsa--what a delight!

Fresh veggies for salsa–what a delight!

 

Tomatoes coarsely chopped in food processor.

Tomatoes coarsely chopped in food processor.

Veggies on top of chopped tomatoes, ready to blend it all together!

Veggies on top of chopped tomatoes, ready to blend it all together!

Freshly made water kefir to add to the salsa

Freshly made water kefir to add to the salsa

All ingredients blended and ready to spoon into jars

All ingredients blended and ready to spoon into jars

Salsa--lids in place and ready to ferment for a day…and enjoy tomorrow!

Salsa–lids in place and ready to ferment for a day…and enjoy tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

 

Excellent Primer on Real Foods, Where to Find Them and How to Use Them!

All the ingredients for soaked and cultured pancakes--delicious and nutritious!

All the ingredients for soaked and cultured pancakes–delicious and nutritious!

If you are keen on where to begin on how to use real foods–maybe you’re even wondering where to FIND real foods–then you’ll want to invest in the fantastic education from Kelly the Kitchen Kop.  And, through the weekend of Thanksgiving here in the US, you can purchase Kelly’s trainings at HALF OFF!  Simply enter BLACKFRIDAY as you check out.

What will you receive in Kelly’s trainings?  Here’s a breakdown:

For the Real Food Ingredient Guide E-book, you’ll find:

This revised version is cram-packed with new information.  What I’m most excited about is that it’s set up in a way that gives you exactly what you want in whichever format you need it in at the moment…

  • It has a newly revised 7-page quick reference guide for when you want fast answers to questions like,
    • Will you please just tell me what I’m supposed to buy?!”
    • Or when someone puts you on the spot and you need a quick reminder of “What was so bad about that food again?
    • Or maybe when you’re at the store you might need something to flip to for guidance there on various ingredients, including “good, better, best” options.
    • It’ll also help you know what to look for at your local farm and what questions to ask.
  • It has a more detailed section with facts on the different food groups and ingredients, for when you have time to dig in a little more, and it includes information on where to go for even more in-depth reading and research.
  • If you’re more of a visual learner, you’ll find an easy top ten real foods and top ten junk foods list in pictures.
  • It also includes new bonus material:  How to bring your family from junk food to real food, and how to overcome the six main obstacles everyone faces:
    1. Motivation – You won’t be willing to make a change if you don’t understand why it’s so important!
    2. Confusion/feeling overwhelmed – You’re probably sick of trying to navigate all the information from the ‘experts’ like what’s ‘good’ vs. what’s ‘not good’, especially when that keeps changing; and you just want to figure out the age-old question of “What the heck can I eat?!”  Especially before meal planning or grocery shopping…
    3. How to afford real food – You’ll learn loads of tips all in one place.
    4. Dealing with family complaints – This can wear you down at times, so I’ve got ways for you to get past this one!
    5. How to make time for real food – There are so many ways that I’ll bet you’ve never thought of!
    6. Sticking to it for the long haul – This is often what trips people up.  Life gets in the way and you find yourself slipping backward.  You’ll learn here how to prevent that from happening or how to get back on track.

And, for Kelly’s Real Food for Rookies Online Class, you’ll receive:

  • 12 weeks of online classes with videos, downloadable audios, and written materials.
  • LIFETIME access! Read/listen/watch at your leisure: on your break at work, while the kids are sleeping, in your pajamas, whatever! If you have a busy week, no big deal, just pick it back up on your own schedule.
  • Exclusive expert interviews with Sally Fallon Morell (President of the Weston Price Foundation), Dr. Kaayla Daniel (author of The Whole Soy Story), Jane Hersey (Director of the Feingold Association), Tom Naughton (Fathead filmmaker), and now one more: Jimmy Moore from the Livin LaVida Low-Carb blog!
  • BONUS: Free copy of the Kitchen Kop Real Food Guide
  • Save time and money while serving Real Food
  • Read labels and avoid dangerous ingredients
  • Make nourishing “fast food” meals to avoid last-minute trips to the drive-thru
  • Find healthier alternatives for soda pop, refined sugars, heart-killer oils, sugar-bomb breakfast cereals, factory farmed meat and more
  • Serve nutrient-dense foods that are necessary for good health
  • Take control of your health and change your family’s future!

Both of these tools are invaluable in your journey to greater health and empowerment for yourself and your family.  It takes a village to recapture  the information that’s been lost over the years in regard to how to take care ourselves with nutrition, and Kelly’s classes and information are priceless in their role of keeping you well!  And, from Thursday, November 28th until Monday, December 2nd 2013, you can get these classes and information at half price, by entering BLACKFRIDAY as you check out.

Wishing you the best!  Here’s to your health and the health of your loved ones!

Sprouted and Cultured Spelt Pancakes

 

Delicious cultured and sprouted spelt pancakes, cooked in pastured beef tallow and filled with organic blueberries

Delicious cultured and sprouted spelt pancakes, cooked in pastured beef tallow and filled with organic blueberries

Who doesn’t love pancakes?

On a Saturday morning, they are an absolute delight, topped with butter, yogurt, maple syrup, fresh fruit, honey, molasses…or enjoyed as-is!  And, if enough are prepared, they make an easy snack or a yummy breakfast reheated in the toaster oven the next day.  Who wouldn’t love that?

I expect you’ll love this recipe as much as we do, if you’re wishing for some pancakes, but would like a healthier version.  Using the principles of predigestion by fermentation, these pancakes are nutritious, filling and they keep the body’s energy more even than the usual pancake.  While spelt is not gluten-free, the carbohydrates in this recipe have been broken down tremendously by way of fermentation, a la water kefir (my go-to homemade fermented beverage that has 101 uses.)  This process makes the pancakes less of a blood sugar spike, especially when paired with lots of butter or whole fat yogurt.  Soaking the flour in water kefir also breaks down various anti-nutritients, including gluten, helping you to get the most nutrition from the spelt. And from a flavor standpoint?  These have a similar flavor profile to sourdough–absolutely delicious!

And how the heck does one make pancakes from flour that is already wet?  Well, by way of mixing all the other ingredients and then incorporating them into the soaked and fermented flour, an even distribution of all ingredients is easily had. Just follow the directions below and enjoy!

Sprouted and Cultured Spelt Pancakes

Makes approximately 16-5″ pancakes
  • 2 1/2 cups Sprouted Spelt Flour
  • 1-1 1/2 cups warm, filtered Water (105 degree Fahrenheit range)
  • 1/2 cup fresh Water Kefir
  • 1 1/2  cups Whole Milk, preferably raw
  • 2 Eggs, beaten
  • 1/4 cup Ghee (clarified butter) or Coconut Oil
  • 3 tablespoons Raw Sugar or Coconut Crystals
  • 1 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • 3/4 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • 1 tablespoon Real Vanilla Extract
  • Fat or oil for the griddle (Pastured Lard, Coconut Oil, Pastured Tallow, Ghee)

The evening before you plan to make your pancakes, in a large, glass mixing bowl, add the warm water and water kefir to the flour.  Mix all ingredients well, then cover with a lid and set in a warm environment.  I use my yogurt maker, plugged in, with the the dome lid removed and the bowl resting in the top of the maker.  You could also use a dehydrator with the trays removed, and set to 100 degrees Fahrenheit.  If you don’t have either of these, use a microwave (turned off!), oven (turned off!) or ice chest–what you need is an incubation chamber, and it should have at least a couple of bottles filled with hot water to keep the air temperature warm.  (The beneficial bacteria and yeast in the water kefir like a warm temperature to function and thrive, so keeping the air  warm will allow for more breakdown of the complex carbohydrates into simpler, easier to digest sugars.)  Plan to keep your flour soaking and fermenting in the range of 6-10 hours.

When you’ve finished the first stage of soaking and fermenting, you’ll likely notice a tart, lively smell as you remove the lid and see that the batter has risen–lacto-fermenation!  In a separate bowl, combine all the remaining dry ingredients and mix well.  In another bowl, add all the remaining wet ingredients and mix well.  Add the dry to the wet ingredients, mix well and incorporate them into the soaked flour.  You’ll likely notice the batter rising substantially as the baking soda comes into contact with the fermented grains.

Heat a griddle or frying pan to low-medium heat, and add your choice of oil or fat to coat the cooking surface.  Once a drop of batter bubbles on the oil, add a ladle of batter, letting it cook until bubbles appear throughout the pancake, then flip over.  These pancakes will be more moist than those made with dry flour, so be sure the heat isn’t too high so that the pancakes have an opportunity to cook through on both sides without burning.

Top immediately with butter  and any other accompaniments of your choice–maple syrup, yogurt, yacon syrup, molasses, fresh fruit are great choices.  Or, if you’d like to save them to reheat later, simply set them on a plate, and stack each with a piece of parchment paper between, to keep them from sticking to one another.  Store, covered, in the refrigerator and enjoy within a few days’ time.

Pancake ingredients, step one! Water kefir, warm water and sprouted spelt flour.

Pancake ingredients, step one!
Water kefir, warm water and sprouted spelt flour.

Pouring in the water kefir to the flour and water.

Pouring in the water kefir to the flour and water.

Consistency of batter after water and water kefir have been added.

Consistency of batter after water and water kefir have been added.

Sprouted spelt batter with water kefir, resting and warming on the yogurt maker.

Sprouted spelt batter with water kefir, resting and warming on the yogurt maker.

Sprouted spelt pancake batter the next morning after a long, warm fermentation

Sprouted spelt pancake batter the next morning after a long, warm fermentation–notice how much it has risen overnight.  Thank you, beneficial bacteria and yeasts!

Sprouted spelt risen in the bowl, ready to add the other ingredients.

Sprouted spelt risen in the bowl, ready to add the other ingredients.

All the ingredients for the pancakes--delicious and nutritious!

All the ingredients for the pancakes–delicious and nutritious!

Dry ingredients with wet ingredients, added to the soaked and fermented flour.

Dry ingredients with wet ingredients, added to the soaked and fermented flour.

 

Consistency of batter as it's ready to cook...notice the bubbles of activity from the baking soda working on the fermented grains.

Consistency of batter as it’s ready to cook…notice the bubbles of activity from the baking soda working on the fermented grains.

 

Pancake ready to flip--notice the bubbles.

Pancake ready to flip–notice the bubbles.

 

Crispy on the edges, delicious on the inside...perfect sprouted and cultured spelt pancake!

Crispy on the edges, delicious on the inside…perfect sprouted and cultured spelt pancake!